Book Review: Unhallowed Ground by Mel Starr

By Nate LaClaire —  January 27, 2012 — 4 Comments

In Mel Starr’s fourth tale of Hugh de Singleton, medieval surgeon, Unhallowed Ground, we find our protagonist investigating the murder of one Thomas atte Bridge after this unlikable fellow is found hanging from a tree. While Master Hugh would like to believe the popular opinion that the victim took his own life, his finding of evidence to the contrary requires him to investigate his friends and neighbors to determine who took the life of their common enemy.

I enjoyed this book immensely. The story, which is written in the first person, pulled me in and helped me to understand the culture through the eyes of one of its inhabitants. A thorough glossary is included in the front of the book for assistance in understanding some of the more archaic terms that are used throughout the book. That is to say, the book is not only enjoyable but also educational. The story is also aided by a map in the front of the book that shows where locations in the book are in relation to each other.

One of the things that I enjoyed about the book was seeing the author’s own modern-day thoughts expressed through the Master Hugh. Numerous times in the book the narrator explains a religious or other practice or belief and then offers his disagreement with the practice or belief. It is fascinating to see some aspects of the culture of 1366 and these comments helped to remind me that it is unrealistic to believe that the entire population agreed with all of what we would now consider primitive ideas.

Among other things, the book shows that Christ can change our hearts and that we must not assume that this fact applies only to ourselves. Master Hugh learns this lesson when he takes a long journey to find the man he is certain committed the murder only to find someone else entirely.

I was afraid that a book about a medieval surgeon would include descriptions of medical practices that I would rather not know about (or be reminded of), but this was not the case. While it did describe some medical procedures, I found the descriptions non-nightmare-inducing.

This is an excellent book and I encourage you to read it if you like mysteries and/or historical fiction.

Nate LaClaire

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Nate LaClaire is a Christian millennial web developer and entrepreneur who writes about faith, life, and intentional living. He is lead developer at Home Building Estimates and owner of Netwalker Internet Services.
  • Anonymous

    Sounds like a great book. It’s always good to read books that show how God changes hearts and minds. Thank you for reviewing it.

    • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

      Thanks for reading and commenting! Amen to that. If you decide to read the book, I’d love to hear what you thought of it.

      • Anonymous

        I have a lot of books I need to read before I read this one. I’ll let you know how I liked it if I read the book.

        • http://natelaclaire.com/ Nate LaClaire

          I totally know the feeling. Thanks! Carpe diem!